PRESS


 
 

Meli Studios' Julie Ockerby's tips on dementia design

 
Published: 3 September 2019
By: Geraldine Cardozo
Source: The Senior
 

FOR people living with dementia, disorientation and confusion can be very stressful and unsettling.

A well thought-out space plan and environment can help ease stress levels and maximises well-being and independence.

Former registered nurse Julie Ockerby was so frustrated by the lack of quality fabrics tailored to the aged, and the predominance of uninspiring beige (her personal design bugbear), that this year she released her own dementia-friendly fabric range, The Bespoke Collection.

Now an interior designer, and Principal Creative Director of Sydney-based Meli Studio, Julie is on a mission to enhance the quality of design in aged care across Australia with 19 projects on the go in Australia and overseas.

Julie's inspiration came from a deeply personal experience: "My father was ill and needed a nursing home, but I couldn't find one to the standards I felt he deserved.

"Nobody was considering the environment as adding to his quality of life - somewhere designed with heart and soul," she said.

"People deserve to be in a space where they are cared for with privacy and dignity. The names of the fabrics have been synonymously chosen to reflect various influences in my design journey. They are a culmination of my cultural heritage and love of travel, food and wine."

Her new fabric range encorporates bright but not overbearing colours, simple patterns, soft but hardwearing textures and the obligatory waterproof backing.

Here Julie shares her tips on dementia-friendly design:

Keeping it Simple
To live well with dementia means to keep the surroundings simple, and risk-free. Being able to see objects and spaces clearly enables people to live comfortably and without the risk of falls.

The use of colour to contrast between floors and furniture, doors and walls, handles that contrast to the joinery, toilet seats that contrast to the toilet suite, are all simple mechanics to enable people to be able to see and to be seen.

Familiar & Functional
Human behaviour dictates that the more familiar we are with our space, the more accommodated we feel. This behaviour, together with everyday routines, means that we have reached our comfort zone. It is no different when living with dementia, except that it is more heightened:

  • Keeping furniture placement in spaces that are familiar for the person is very important.
  • Keeping bathroom doors open.
  • Leaving items out for easy reach, e.g. toothbrushes and toothpaste
  • Implement grab rails, particularly in bathroom spaces where the highest rate of falls occurs
  • Ensure that the room temperature works for the person. Not too cold, not too warm.


Helpful Stimulation

When designing for dementia, try to avoid patterns and lights that can overstimulate the person. Bold and strong abstract patterns can cause confusion and stress. Similarly, lights that cause undue glare can be very disorientating.

Cognitive engagement, together with encouragement to participate in daily activities enables one to live more comfortably.

This can be the use of memory prompters, such as nostalgic artworks that prompt conversation pieces, or decorative items that are reminiscent of years before.

Other forms of helpful stimulation:

  • Integrating pets into everyday living encourages tactility
  • Visible clocks that are readable enables one to have a sense of time
  • Create opportunities to socialise and interact with friends and family enables one to retains feelings of value and importance
  • Stimulating the five senses, especially the senses of smell and taste go hand-in-hand. Cooking food that hits the taste palette brings enjoyment to the eating experience.
  • The ability to enjoy outdoor friendly spaces with fresh air and sunlight encourages the desire to remain active and involved.
  • Adding in tactile and textural activities such as gardening.

Designing for dementia does not need to be bland or beige. You can still achieve design sophistication whilst following the above guidelines. That is the same with achieving contrast through use of colour - it doesn't need to be over the top! You can still achieve contrast and have a simply beautiful design.


Swatches from The Bespoke Collection - inspired by Julie Ockerby's cultural heritage and travels.

The Bespoke Collection
The range is split into five collections to cater to a broad range of interior styles, tastes and settings:

  • 'Escape' with a laid back, beachy vibe
  • 'Promise' featuring bolder patterns for more directional interiors
  • 'Humble' with more subtle tones and textures
  • 'Untouched' for even softer design, reflecting the tranquillity of botanical landscapes
  • 'Plains' to allow for simpler styling when needed

To see the full range visit www.thebespokecollectionaustralia.com phone (02) 8920-3538 or email hello@thebespokecollectionaustralia.com

 


 
  
 

Recognised on the world stage, winning the Gold & Silver Stevie

 
Source: https://stevieawards.com/IBA
 

Julie Ockerby, former registered nurse turned boutique hotel marketer, now an interior architect and designer who is championing ageing gracefully, has again been recognised on the world stage, winning the Gold Stevie award for ‘Entrepreneur of the Year - Business & Professional Services’ and a Silver Stevie for ‘Woman of the Year’ in the  International Business Awards, one of the world’s most prestigious programs.
 
The 2019 IBAs received over 4,000 entries from organizations in 74 nations and territories. Nicknamed the Stevies after the Greek word for ‘crowned’, the awards will be presented to winners at a gala banquet in Austria in October. The judges, a global panel of 250 prominent business leaders, described Julie as having ‘an extraordinary humanistic idea’ with ‘enormous impact on the future of all people’ and an ‘exemplary business giving its clients dignity as well as value’.

 


 
Estia opens renovated Southport Facility
                               Living area at Esita Southport
 

Australian Ageing Agenda, Estia opens renovated Southport facility

 
Published: 19 July 2019
Souce: Australia Ageing Agenda
 

Estia Health has unveiled its redeveloped 110-bed residential aged care facility in Southport, Queensland.

The facility includes a 17-bed memory support unit, meals cooked by chefs daily, a beauty salon, private dining room, cinema, library and café. It features private spaces for residents, bay windows in some bedrooms and a vertical garden on the terrace.

The facility was designed by Brisbane architects Deicke Richards and interior designer Julie Ockerby from Meli Studio.

  
Noticeboard

  


 
 

Julie Ockerby Aged Care Projects Interview

 
Published: 4 June 2019
Interview by: Brooke Hunter
Source: www.female.com.au
 
Julie and her team at Meli Studio Australia have now added visionary commercial partners such as Allity, Uniting and Aurrum to their loyal residential client portfolio, together raising the bar on design expectations for aged care in Australia and determined to continue to push the boundaries of both design and functionality until the growing number of residents in Meli Studio-designed homes are able to age as gracefully as possible.

Julie’s inspiration came from a deeply personal experience: “My father was ill and needed a nursing home, but I couldn’t find one to the standards I felt he deserved. Nobody was considering the environment as adding to his quality of life – somewhere designed with heart and soul”

Further impetus to look beyond Australia came from visiting facilities in Singapore and finding striking exteriors hiding soul-less institutional interiors. Julie is now a member of Ageing Asia’s Fast Track team, who conduct masterclasses in best practice aged care around the region. For this, she was recognised with the coveted Trailblazer Award at the Asia Pacific Eldercare Innovation Awards in 2018, and two projects were featured as finalists in the Asia Pacific Eldercare Innovation Awards 2019.

Julie’s philosophy is simple: “People deserve to be in a space where they are cared for with privacy and dignity.”

“Why can’t aged care bedrooms be designed more like hotel suites? Why can’t dining areas be more interactive and truly inspire all five senses, as we see in modern restaurants? Our recent aged care home projects feature cafés, hotel-style reception or lobby spaces, hair salons and cinemas. Moving forward, I’d like to see the design trends embracing the whole family to encourage intergenerational involvement. Areas such as private dining rooms needs to be more than a big table with 12 chairs, they have to involve the outdoor spaces and landscape features, such as playgrounds”, Julie concludes.

Meli Studio also works on specialist dementia units, evolving the use colour psychology and its effect on behaviours to create less of an institutional feel. Julie designs the floor plates for these areas to support movement and engagement, and links to the community together with effective use of colour and textures, bringing a new dimension to dementia design.

David Armstrong, CEO of Allity Aged Care, adds “With her uniquely diverse background in hospitality and healthcare, Julie has challenged and broadened our design vision to create outstanding, uplifting environments that our residents are proud to call home.”

Meli Studio has grown twofold in the past 12 months. With 19 projects in development across Australia, Julie and her team will continue to reinvigorate our aged care facilities while expanding into Asia and even eyeing the USA.

Interview with Julie Ockerby, Principal Creative Director of Meli Studio

Question: What inspired you and Meli Studio to specialise in interior design for aged care?

Julie Ockerby: My inspiration came from a deeply personal experience – my father was ill and needed a nursing home, but I couldn’t find one to the standards I felt he deserved. Nobody was considering the environment as adding to his quality of life – somewhere designed with heart and soul. Aged care homes were improving but still not well thought-out, so I saw an opportunity to combine my nursing background, hotel experience and interior design training to do a better job.

Question: How does Meli Studio Australia ensure they raise the bar for aged care expectations?

Julie Ockerby: We don’t design just for the sake of design, but rather with thought and heart. We see our clients as partners and ourselves as advisors. Each project is a unique collaboration, starting with their vision and brief, which we often challenge and expand on to arrive at the best possible outcome.

Question: What is your goal when designing and decorating an aged care bedroom?

Julie Ockerby: Most of the time a bedroom will house just one resident, so it may not be that big, creating an extra imperative for design to maximise the use of space, just like a designer hotel room, but feeling more like a home away from home. Savvy operators are catching onto the multiple benefits of bigger bedrooms – think of it as an upgrade from a standard room to a suite – so you may have a living area as a sanctuary away from other residents, a balcony for fresh air, and even a wet bar for entertaining guests.

Question: How do you use colour psychology in your designs?

Julie Ockerby: Our projects often feature various levels of care – the higher the care the more behaviours come into play – for example orange is a creative colour but too harsh for dementia patients, for whom we tend to use calming colours like soft greens. We also use colour zones as a tool to help the aged in finding their way around the different areas of their homes. And a caveat is how different colours have different cultural connotations. For example, I use purple here in projects like Allity Greenwood. Northern Sydney for its calming and regal qualities, but in Asia it can carry funereal connotations. Lastly, we aim to use colours that harmonise with their settings, like the coastal palette at Uniting Care Gerringong, NSW South Coast, but richer palettes in colder areas.

Question: How does colour affect our feelings and behaviours?

Julie Ockerby: To a huge extent! Healthcare has been very beige but that’s very sterile colour and one of my pet hates – who wants to live in a home that looks like a hospital?

Question: Which colours are your favourite for aged care bedrooms and why?

Julie Ockerby: Stylish but warm, neutral palettes to allow residents to bring in their own touches, but I always like to add a hit of colour that ‘pops’ to keep it interesting. For example, a sapphire blue or emerald green bedspread.

Question: What’s a typical day like, for you?

Julie Ockerby: I wish I could answer that! As a single mum with two teens and no home help, running one business and about to start another, I don’t have single a typical day or week, especially as I travel for work interstate at least once a fortnight and overseas around once a month.

Question: What’s next for Meli Studio Australia?

Julie Ockerby: Definitely Asian markets, starting with Vietnam, where I have a couple of projects in discussion. Then my dream is to look at the USA, where they do many things well but not aged care. In fact, I think culturally they could learn a lot from the APAC region about seniors living and care. Also, in June 2019, I’m launching a new venture with The Bespoke Collection Australia collection of fabrics designed specifically for aged care – a Signature Plains range plus four key ranges denoting various inspirational landscapes and styles. Names of colours have been synonymously chosen to reflect various influences in my design journey. They are a culmination of my cultural heritage and love of travel, food and wine. You can see the full range at  www.thebespokecollectionaustralia.com.au 

 


aged care design

Aged Care Trend Report from Architectural Review

 
Covering current thinking, technology, the rejection of institutionalised homogenous design and the move towards an individually focused approach, ADR’s Aged Care Design Trend Report is a must-read for all designers and architects. 
 
Published: 27 May 2019
Source: Australian Design Review Trend report Aged care Meli Studio 2019.pdf Australian Design Review Trend report Aged care Meli Studio 2019.pdf  (3.13 MB)
Source: www.australiandesignreview.com
 

Launched at a breakfast panel event last week ,the report provides a deep dive into the aged care design landscape now and in the future.

Based on insight from a variety of design experts and academics, the report focuses on the way aged care spaces are increasingly ‘homes away from homes’.

For Mark Trotter, a director at Brisbane- headquartered Fulton Trotter Architects, the challenge, as he sees it, is to design facilities that minimise the public perception of ‘institutionalisation’.

“Architecture that is anywhere from comfortable to exciting is needed to at least partially overcome this fear, rather than buildings that present as clinical and soulless. The aim is to reduce institutional ideas from the broadest concept right down to detail… Designing retirement living facilities is all about creating a community where people have choices, which range from complete privacy through to full engagement with the wider world.”

The report also highlights some key statistics that will impact how we designed aged care facilities going forward. For example: By 2057, it is projected there will be 8.8 million older Australians (22 percent of the population); by 2097, 12.8 million people (25 percent) will be aged 65 years and over.

And it is the Baby Boomer generation that is driving change according to Ownworld’s Fiona Katashima and Peter Quintal-Norris.

” [They] are driving this opportunity to redefine the lifestyle quality of how and where we may choose to spend our senior years. Everyone relates to and benefits from beautiful, sunlit surroundings whether they are 16 or 86 and this is not new. What is new is the residents being their own advocates for improved aesthetically beautiful and comfortable environments.

“Of course, there will always be specialist needs for a percentage of aged care residents, but alongside the equipment there is no reason the rest of the environment needs to resemble something out of Charles Dickens or Ken Kesey.”

The report also focuses on how to design for dementia and the impact of new technology.

 


 

Bright colours, clever design and sunshine help to transform aged care

 
Published: 21 May 2019
By: Mark Skelsey, News Editor of Downsizing.com.au. Please contact Mark at news@downsizing.com.au
Source: www.Downsizing.com.au
 
Interior designers, architects and operators are challenging traditional perceptions about aged care, by introducing new bright colours, luxury features and clever layout solutions to improve resident care.

The aged care industry has historically provided clinical-style rooms and corridors which feel more like hospitals than homes for residents.

However, a range of experts have told Downsizing.com.au about the quiet revolution underway in the aged care industry, which has meant residents can enjoy a luxury-style living environment which encourages mental stimulation and social interaction.

Good architectural design is vital

Damian Barker, the design director of architectural firm  Jackson Teece, said the move towards well-considered and quality aged care design had been underway for at least ten years.

He said his firm was now starting to do some “very luxurious” aged care projects, while acknowledging there was also an ongoing need for good quality accommodation “for people who haven’t got the wealth advantage of many in the community”.

                                                                                    Jackson Teece Design Director Damian Barker

“The key objective is to make a large facility as comfortable and homely as possible, for residents who have come from an independent house,” he said. “Interior designers work hard to create living environments, which are consistent with what you would find in a lovely house.”

“We are talking about rooms with natural light, good views, opening windows and spaces for people to sit and for the facility to not feel like a hospital.

“In addition, you might try to disguise services in the facility…things like nurse stations and medicine rooms. You are trying to create an environment in which residents are living in a communal household.”

Mr Barker said the orientation of the proposed facility, to allow residents who may be bed-ridden to have views, along with the placement of outdoor areas around the facility, was also important to improve the quality of care.

In addition, Mr Barker there was an increasing understanding that there is a need to design facilities to respond to patients who had dementia or vision issues, including allowing these residents to more easily distinguish between colours and surfaces.

The management of people with dementia in aged care, including the need to limit the use of physical and chemical constraints, has been a major issue examined by the  Aged Care Royal Commission. Good facility design is seen is a critical way to support this outcome.

                                      Lobby of the Regis Elermore Vale aged care facility in the NSW Hunter region – designed by Jackson Teece

Bright colours are important

In June 2019, Sydney-based interior designer Julie Ockerby (pictured above) will release a new range of fabrics, designed for aged care facilities. She describes the fabrics as having “bright but not overbearing colours, simple patterns, soft but hard-wearing textures and the obligatory waterproof backing.”

The new fabrics are part of Ms Ockerby’s mission to improve the standard of interior design at aged care facilities.

She says she was driven to the sector after she found it difficult to find a well-designed nursing home for her father. “My father was ill and needed a nursing home, but I couldn’t find one to the standards I felt he deserved,” she said. “Nobody was considering the environment as adding to his quality of life – somewhere designed with heart and soul”.

Ms Ockerby’s firm  Meli Studio has also designed a range of aged care projects, which are described as looking more like “five-star, boutique hotels, with luxe lobbies, sumptuous suites, beauty salons, cafés, cinemas and private dining rooms.” The latest of these projects is  Uniting Care Gerringong on the coast just South of Sydney.

                                             Room at Uniting Care Gerringong

“Why can’t aged care bedrooms be designed more like hotel suites?,” Ms Ockerby says.

“Why can’t dining areas be more interactive and truly inspire all five senses, as we see in modern restaurants? Our recent aged care home projects feature cafés, hotel-style reception or lobby spaces, hair salons and cinemas.

“Moving forward, I’d like to see the design trends embracing the whole family to encourage intergenerational involvement.

“Areas such as private dining rooms needs to be more than a big table with 12 chairs, they have to involve the outdoor spaces and landscape features, such as playgrounds.”

New aged care project in Queensland

More recently, the  Palm Lake Group has announced the launch of a brand new $35 million class-leading residential aged caring community at Beachmere, in the State’s Moreton Bay region.

Each of the project’s 102 light and bright private ensuited rooms have outdoor access, while the project also includes facilities such as a café, hair salon, movie theatre and multiple lounge and dining options, including room service.

The project also features elegant Hamptons styling like its Palm Lake Group stablemate, Palm Lake Resort Beachmere Bay, located just across the road.

 
  


 

 

Designing emotion and comfort into a home

 
Published: 19 May 2019
By: Katie McKeown
Source: www.insideageing.com.au
 
Julie Ockerby, Principal Creative Director of  Meli Studio , is fast becoming a sensation in the world of aged care interior design, where her experience as a nurse and focus on comfort and style, sets her apart from other designers. With 19 projects in development across Australia and others overseas, Inside Ageing caught up with Julie last week to learn more about her vision for comfort and style in aged care.
How has your experience as a nurse helped you as an interior designer?

I wouldn’t be able to design interiors for aged care without my nursing background. It gives me a unique understanding and insight into both the functional and operational needs, allowing me to create spaces that the residents love while still allowing their carers to care to the best of their ability. I have been in their shoes so I know what they need to do their often challenging jobs.

I loved nursing but I couldn’t seem myself still there in five years, plus I felt obsessed with hotels, so when I saw an opportunity to move into luxury hotel marketing I jumped at it. From there I realised that my true obsession was with how spaces are put together, so I studied interior design and made the switch into what was destined to become my life’s true calling.

Why is interior design so important in aged care settings?

We use interior design to create spaces that residents feel truly become their homes. We add a dash of hotel design and high end touches to make the homes feel aspirational – as good if not better than how they are used to living.

What are the most important things for aged care providers to consider when refurbishing or developing a facility or home?

There are two things I am especially focussed on at the moment: firstly, designing for the residents of the future with features like USB chargers and smart door locks. Secondly, designing for the whole family not just the residents – creating spaces for multiple generations of visitors to feel comfortable in.

When competition for funding is strong, what do you say to aged care providers who want to cut the budget for interior design?

The back of house facilities are of course important in aged care, but the reality is people buy into the emotional experience and attachment that great interior design can create. You can’t really put a price on creating an emotional connection between residents and their future home.

What are the fast and inexpensive things you recommend to aged care providers to drastically improve interiors?

The three easiest and most cost effective wins are lighting features, well thought-out and vibrant colour palettes, and carefully curated artworks that bring the spaces to life, stimulate the senses and tie the homes in with their local surroundings.

You have created your own range of textiles, how are these different to what was already available on the market?

I found that what was available was limited in terms of patterns, without a diverse enough colour palette, and with too much beige – a pet hate of mine! So, in June 2019, The Bespoke Collection Australia will launch a Signature Plains range plus four  key ranges denoting various inspirational landscapes and styles. Names of colours have been synonymously chosen to reflect various influences in my design journey. They are a culmination of my cultural heritage and love of travel, food and wine. You can see the full range at  www.thebespokecollectionaustralia.com.au.

What has inspired the patterns and colours in this new range?

ESCAPE
reflects a laid back vibe and is influenced by the coastal and nautical elements of the beautiful Northern Beaches of Sydney, where I live.

PROMISE
prompted by a succession of devastating world events, this range seeks to encapsulate the notion of always ‘promising’ hope. The boldness of the designs depict universal strength.

HUMBLE
designed based on the ambiguity of social trends and inspired by the conversed nature of them. Therefore this range is soft and subtle in its tones and textures.

UNTOUCHED
reflecting textures of the botanical landscape, soil and earth. This range resembles nature in its most magnified form.

SIGNATURE PLAINS
this range carries an extensive colour palette and is designed to complement the four other ranges as a timeless collection of colours and textures.

For sales enquiries contact +61 2 8920 3538 or  hello@thebespokecollectionaustralia.com

 
  


The Bespoke Collection Australia Fabrics Launch

 

Julie Ockerby’s Meli Studio – champions of sophisticated seniors living

 
Published: 7 May 2019
Source: getbuilding.com.au
Source: www.thebespokecollectionaustralia.com
 

Julie and her team at Meli Studio Australia have now added visionary commercial partners such as Allity, Uniting and Aurrum to their loyal residential client portfolio, together raising the bar on design expectations for aged care in Australia and determined to continue to push the boundaries of both design and functionality until the growing number of residents in Meli Studio-designed homes are able to age as gracefully as possible.

Julie’s inspiration came from a deeply personal experience: “My father was ill and needed a nursing home, but I couldn’t find one to the standards I felt he deserved. Nobody was considering the environment as adding to his quality of life – somewhere designed with heart and soul”

Further impetus to look beyond Australia came from visiting facilities in Singapore and finding striking exteriors hiding soul-less institutional interiors. Julie is now a member of Ageing Asia’s Fast Track team, who conduct masterclasses in best practice aged care around the region. For this, she was recognised with the coveted Trailblazer Award at the Asia Pacific Eldercare Innovation Awards in 2018, and two projects were featured as finalists in the Asia Pacific Eldercare Innovation Awards 2019.

Julie’s philosophy is simple: “People deserve to be in a space where they are cared for with privacy and dignity.”

“Why can’t aged care bedrooms be designed more like hotel suites? Why can’t dining areas be more interactive and truly inspire all five senses, as we see in modern restaurants? Our recent aged care home projects feature cafés, hotel-style reception or lobby spaces, hair salons and cinemas. Moving forward, I’d like to see the design trends embracing the whole family to encourage intergenerational involvement. Areas such as private dining rooms needs to be more than a big table with 12 chairs, they have to involve the outdoor spaces and landscape features, such as playgrounds.”, Julie concludes.

Meli Studio also works on specialist dementia units, evolving the use colour psychology and its effect on behaviours to create less of an institutional feel. Julie designs the floor plates for these areas to support movement and engagement, and links to the community together with effective use of colour and textures, bringing a new dimension to dementia design.

David Armstrong, CEO of Allity Aged Care, adds “With her uniquely diverse background in hospitality and healthcare, Julie has challenged and broadened our design vision to create outstanding, uplifting environments that our residents are proud to call home.”

Meli Studio has grown twofold in the past 12 months. With 19 projects in development across Australia, Julie and her team will continue to reinvigorate our aged care facilities while expanding into Asia and even eyeing the USA.

The Bespoke Collection Australia by Julie Ockerby – fabrics tailored to stylish living for seniors

Julie was so frustrated by the lack of quality fabrics tailored to the aged, and the predominance of uninspiring beige (her personal design bugbear), that June 2019 will see the release her own fabric range, The Bespoke Collection Australia, pictured here. Bright but not overbearing colours, simple patterns, soft but hardwearing textures and the obligatory waterproof backing.

The range is split into five collections to cater to a broad range of interior styles and settings:

  • Escape with a laid back, beachy vibe
  • Promise featuring bolder patterns for more directional interiors
  • Humble with more subtle tones and textures
  • Untouched for even softer design, reflecting the tranquillity of botanical landscapes
  • Plains to allow for simpler styling when needed

The Bespoke Collection will be available from May 2019.
For sales inquiries contact +61 2 8920 3538 or  hello@thebespokecollectionaustralia.com .

Once Bespoke is launched, Julie will be turning her skills to designing a collection of outdoor furniture to allow seniors to spend more time outdoors in comfort and style.

 
  


  

  

And the Award Goes to…

  
Published: 16 November 2018
Source: www.stevieawards.com 
Source: www.technologydecisions.com.au
  
Julie Ockerby of Meli Studio was awarded the 2018 Gold Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in Asia, Australia or New Zealand. Presented at Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York
  

WINNER 2018

Stevie Awards
Gold Stevie Award
Female Entrepreneur
of the Year Asia, Australia
or New Zealand

Julie Ockerby, Meli Studio

 
  


  


  

Fighting Govt red tape: ThomsonAdsett co-hosts seniors’ living master class in Malaysia and Thailand

  
Published: 21 August 2018
Source: www.TheWeeklySource.com.au
  

A joint initiative between the leading architectural firm and Ageing Asia Alliance, Fast Track saw over 100 attendees gather in Kuala Lumpur and 60 in Bangkok to discuss the challenges of Governments and local authorities grappling to provide care and accommodation for seniors within existing ministerial structures and regulations.

Now in its second year, participants were advised by ThomsonAdsett’s Chairman Emeritus David Lane and International Seniors Living Partner Patrick Ong as well as Bridge Advisory Group, interior design firm Meli Studio and law firm Thomson Geer.

 
  


 

Julie Ocerby Business Chicks shoutout

 

Your win is our win!

 
Paublished: June 2018
Source: www.businesschicks.com
 

Thanks for the mention in Business Chicks Latte  magazine

 
  


 Julie Ocerby Designer Profile Esque Mag
 

Julie's Designer Profile for Meli Studio featured in Esque magazine

  
Published: 2018
Source: www.baresque.com.au

 


Eldercare Logo
 
Published: May 2018
Source: www.ageingasia.com
  
Meli Studio is finalist for the Ageing Asia Eldercare Innovations of Excellence Awards 2018 for two of our leading projects in the category of Best Interior Design. The awards where held in Singapore.
 

FINALIST 2018

FINALIST 2018

Eldercare Innovation Awards
Best Silver Interior Design
Project size below 20,000sqm

Meli Studio

Eldercare Innovation Awards
Best Silver Interior Design
Project size below 20,000sqm

Meli Studio & Allity Aged Care

 


 
 
 

Asia Pacific Care Business Trailblazer

Published: November 2018
Source: www.stevieawards.com
 
Julie has also been recognised in the category of Asia Pacific Care Business Trailblazer award which recognises individuals making a difference, pushing the boundaries, innovating change in their own markets within Asia Pacific 
  
 

WINNER 2018

Eldercare Innovation Awards  
Ageing Asia  
Global Ageing Trailblazer

Julie Ockerby


 
Room with a View pdf download
 

Luxury Home Design 14.5

 
Source: Download Room with a View.pdf Download Room with a View.pdf  (413.31 KB)